“Good Witch” – “ Bad Witch”


I recently came upon an article discussing the “crazies” in Pagan communities. Here, you should read it too:


But I’ll give you some highlights…


A lot of pagans? Douchebags. Complete tools. So, so fucked up.


The thing with paganisim, witchcraft, wicca and all that jazz is that it is a religion of individuality, and the shadow side of that is that it can really easily turn into a religion of ego.


I couldn’t take it. I was done with the events where one douchebag would talk over the main speaker, just to prove how much he knew.

I was done hanging out with people who wanted to be witchy because they wanted to be edgy and cool.

I was done with the shallowness of it all, with the constant ego battles, with the drama and the showing off



Yes, yes, I know every community has them. But don’t you feel like ours attracts just a few more?

I have personally hit this wall more than once and proclaimed that, “I AM DONE” or, “THAT’S IT, I AM GOING SOLITARY.  But here’s the thing: each time I do, I somehow come back… With the support of the wonderful people I have met though my Grove, I continuously end up attending and even hosting “Meet & Greets”.

I can relate to Demi’s desire to draw back from what I call “holier than thou” pagans or the ones who believe the world is owed to them, but if I truly gave up I would never have met some of the wonderful people I now call my Grove.

So, keep trying. Pulling back can sometime give you much needed time to heal, but, when you are ready, be sure to reach out again and tag in someone new.

Communing With Nature

We all strive to do this a little more –to get out and experience nature; to take a walk and meditate on the growth and the decay; to appreciate it all. With the sunny weather we have been having lately, I set out to get my son started early. He is at an age where touching everything is terribly exciting, so we wandered around the yard to see what we could find.

I thought it could be fun, for just a moment, to consider and see the world though his eyes. Everything is new. Everything is exciting. Each and every leaf is a new texture. And every colour is brilliant and thrilling.


Meditation is part of the Druid way, and it can be challenging, but there are many forms of mediation. For me, one of the best ways is to walk in nature and focus only on my breath and embracing the environment around me. It is a single focus that calms the mind and body, and I hope to pass it on to my little one.


I hope we can all take some time, with summer at its peek, to enjoy the beauty that surrounds us all.

Feature in The Wild Hunt



A little feather in the cap of all Nova Scotia Druid Members: We were mentioned in the latest publication of The Wild Hunt.

Have a look: http://wildhunt.org/2016/06/pagan-interfaith-on-cape-breton-island.html


School is ALMOST out for summer….

family in the forest illustration by kiyary1 2

Summer is just around the corner and you know what that means—NO SCHOOL!


This means all the kiddies are going to be in need of more attention and fun activities. Here are a few Druid inspired ideas you can do as a family or that you can help your younglings do.


  1. Meditate: Start small and just breathe. Meditation is important throughout our lives and instilling these skills and values early can help with a great many of life’s little challenges. Sit with your kid(s) and try it together. Perhaps make it part of a bedtime routine before stories to quiet the mind, body, and spirit.
  2. Build or Redecorate your alter: If they don’t already have a sacred space, let them explore and make one that feels good to them. If they already have one, why not encourage some seasonal decoration? They can dry flowers or leaves, paint rocks, or braid their own herbs and grasses.
  3. Singing and Chanting: Who doesn’t love to sing? You can sing with them and teach them lessons though song. You can sing together as you tidy. Check out the ADF Ritual Songs section for sheet music as well as videos and sound clips for new tunes. https://www.adf.org/rituals/chants/index.html
  4. Hiking and Nature Walks: This is one of my favourites. Communing with nature is a fantastic way to spend time with your family. Turn off the tablets and cell phones and head out to enjoy a park or walking path. You can make it even more fun by keeping nature clippings or a journal. Look for early signs of spring. What is the first flower to make its way through the thawing soil? What kinds of birds and other wildlife do you see? If your child is artistically inclined, invite them to draw the plants and animals they see on your walks.
  5. Crafts: There are so many! Drying your own herbs, making your own oils, making leaf and flower prints, making your own ogham/runes out of sticks, or painting rocks. Check your local craft supplier for beeswax sheets and have the children make their own ritual candles (to be used only with adult supervision). Check out https://tressabelle.wordpress.com/ for tons of other crafting ideas!
  6. Make a Family Tree: Respect for the elders and knowing your history and heritage is important. Why not have the kids draw out or find pictures of their family and arrange them into a family tree?
  7. Gardening: This can be helpful and a great learning experience. Arrange for the kids to either have specific tasks or maybe a small plot of their own. Gardening and horticulture skills are valuable and practical.


There are many things you can do as a family and showing an interest in your children’s projects will help them develop and build confidence and a diverse range of skills.


Good luck, Druid Mommas and Papas!


Illustration Credit: 




Welcome to the Family

After years of wishing and waiting, we are pleased to welcome Ernie to his new home with Daniel and Chrissy Negus and to the Nova Scotia Druids.

Love makes a family.

Welcome, Ernie!




Congratulations to one of our longest standing grove members on completing his Dedicant Path!

Marc is a founding member of The Grove of Nova Scotia Druids and plans to continue his studies through each level with the ADF.

Fantastic job, Marc! Keep up the great work!

The Awen

When you think of Druids, a few things often come to mind: trees, acorns, and the awen. This last, the awen, is of particular interest to us as it is the symbol of our grove. So, what does it mean, what does it stand for, and why is it important to us?

Awen, pronounced “ah-when”, is derived from the Indo-European root *-uel, meaning “to blow”, and has the same root as the Welsh word awel, meaning “breeze'”.  There is a parallel word to ‘awen’ in Irish, ai, which means “poetic inspiration”.

In the Welsh tradition, the awen is seen as the spark of creative or divine inspiration or illumination. It is that which motivates an idea and gives it form. It’s likeness can be meditated upon to draw creative insight for artistic projects of all kinds.


The three dots, or “points of light”, represent the triple aspect of Deity and, on another level, the rising of the sun on the equinoxes and solstices.

The three “rays of light” serve to remind us of the importance of the number three, a sacred number in druidry, as it is in many pagan paths. It is represented, for example, by the three realms: land, sea, and sky (or middle world, upper world, under world);  the three methods of studying/experiencing druidry: the bard, the ovate, and the druid;  and the “triads”, which were ancient Celtic laws and bits of wisdom expressed in threes.

The awen represents not only inspiration but also the creation that ensues and the spirit embedded in it. These are qualities important to any Druid, ancient or modern.


Getting more out of your produce



With the failing dollar, I am sure you are all noticing your grocery bills going up steeply. I know I have. So, in an effort to reduce waste and get a little more out of my food budget, I started doing some research and came up with a few simple tips to best use produce:

  1. Pay attention to your fridge’s crisper drawers, which often feature clear humidity settings for fruits and vegetables. Be sure to separate and store your produce properly, as certain fruits and vegetables can cause others to spoil faster.
  2. It may sound a little gross, but avoid washing your produce right away. The added moisture can encourage rot.
  3. Buy Local! This may not be feasible for everyone, whether related to product affordability or location, but when possible locally grown produce is often better quality and generally has reduced transport time, so your food will last longer.
  4. Buy “young” food. If you don’t need to use it all right away, buying young produce and letting it mature a little will give you some extra time. Additionally, some younger foods hold more nutrition than their older counterparts, e.g. baby spinach.
  5. Don’t over prep. Pre-cut fruits and veggies, when exposed to oxygen for a day, lose 10-25% of their antioxidants, like vitamin c. It may be convenient to cut all your veg at once, but you are cheating yourself of nutrients and speeding up the degradation process.
  6. Fruits and vegetables are best eaten in their natural form. If you must cook, in order to get the best bang for your buck, do not over cook. Try methods such as steaming instead of boiling or nuking in the microwave.
  7. If you aren’t able to use all your produce fast enough, freeze it. I know it doesn’t always sound like the most appealing solution, but it is definitely better than letting good food go to waste. If done properly and while your produce is still fresh, the produce will also retain most of it’s nutrients.
  8. Juicing at home? Juice only what you need. I know it can be tempting to juice extra, but research shows you get the best bang for your buck when you drink it right away.


Those are just some general tips. If you are looking for more specific information, I am rounded up some great links to get you rolling (below). Remember: waste not – want not.






Imbolc Ritual Invite

The Grove of Nova Scotia Druids will be conducting an open Imbolc Ritual at the Universalist Unitarian Church (5500 Inglis St, Halifax, NS) Saturday, February 6, 2016 at 6:30pm.

All are wecome!

Please check out the Facebook event here.

Mabon Ritual Celebration

What a fantastic Mabon celebration this weekend! Ritual and picnic went off without a hitch and, despite the rain, we even had a few guests, including (but not limited to) Erin Picard, our ADF Regional Druid who was down to visit all weekend. Thank you for visiting us! We were very pleased to have you with us for Mabon.


The ritual took place at York Redoubt and highlighted the Harvest, with a strict focus on the rebirth that comes as nature falls. In our moments of reverence for the passing of the trees and the impending winter, we are also reminded of the regeneration that will come with spring and the fun new projects the winter months can yield. All participants were handed acorns as keepsakes or plant-ables to emphasize these values. The Oghams pulled were “Fir” and “Gooseberry”; great omens for a Harvest Festival.


We’ve said a physical “goodbye” to one of our longest standing members, Marc, who is moving away but will be keeping in touch regularly and will come home to us again in what will hopefully be a short two years. He will always be in our thoughts and the Grove will always be his family.

Also of note this fine Nova Scotian murky day was the signing of our Charter. We will be sending off the paperwork to the ADF “Mother Grove” to acquire Full Grove Status, something we have striven to accomplish for many years.

Mabon-9 Mabon-8

Please enjoy a few pictures of our celebration. It was so nice to have guests come out and express their fondness for the Grove’s organization and comradery.

Mabon-11 Mabon-2 Mabon-4 Mabon-5